Harrow Police fine drivers in bike awareness operation in Station Road

Harrow Times: Harrow Police took part in the operation to make drivers more aware of cyclists on the road Harrow Police took part in the operation to make drivers more aware of cyclists on the road

Police fined more than a dozen drivers during an operation aimed at raising awareness of cyclists on Harrow’s roads.

Officers stopped 18 vehicles in Sheepcote Road and Station Road during Operation Cyclops between 7.30am and 9.30am on Thursday, November 28.

Thirteen drivers were handed fixed penalty notices for offences including using their mobile phones whilst driving and failing to wear a seatbelt, while all were given information on being aware of cyclists on the roads.

Two prohibition notices were also issued to drivers of goods vehicles, one for vehicle detail irregularities and one in relation to driving hours.

Six cyclists were killed on London’s roads between November 5 and 18, leading the capital’s mayor Boris Johnson and the Metropolitan Police to call for increased awareness of bikes.

Comments (5)

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11:48pm Thu 5 Dec 13

rabbitz says...

How many cyclists were stopped for running red lights and having no lights at night?
How many cyclists were stopped for running red lights and having no lights at night? rabbitz

1:31am Fri 6 Dec 13

Methodman says...

As the road safety operation was conducted between 0730- 0930,I am guessing that no cyclists were fined for not having lights during the hours of darkness.
With regard to the running of red lights,most cyclists are much more aware of what is going on around them than motorists seem to be,so when they spotted the Police Officers lurking nearby may have thought better of breaking the law in front of them.
Such a shame that 13 motorists have demonstrated their lack of awareness in getting caught without a seatbelt on or using a phone whilst driving.
Not wearing a seatbelt should not be mentioned in the same sentence as using mobile phones whilst driving as the only person that will be harmed as a result of that will be the occupants of the car,whereas using a phone whilst driving is just as reckless as drink driving in my book.
I am glad to see the Police cracking down on errant road users of all types.
As the road safety operation was conducted between 0730- 0930,I am guessing that no cyclists were fined for not having lights during the hours of darkness. With regard to the running of red lights,most cyclists are much more aware of what is going on around them than motorists seem to be,so when they spotted the Police Officers lurking nearby may have thought better of breaking the law in front of them. Such a shame that 13 motorists have demonstrated their lack of awareness in getting caught without a seatbelt on or using a phone whilst driving. Not wearing a seatbelt should not be mentioned in the same sentence as using mobile phones whilst driving as the only person that will be harmed as a result of that will be the occupants of the car,whereas using a phone whilst driving is just as reckless as drink driving in my book. I am glad to see the Police cracking down on errant road users of all types. Methodman

7:46am Sat 7 Dec 13

rabbitz says...

No matter whether you are a car driver or pedestrian or cyclist, lorry driver etc etc there are idiots to be found in all these groups, Having a "Bike awareness operation" and finding only people using mobile phones and not wearing seatbelts would indicate that it had failed, This was a kneejerk reaction to the latest cycle deaths what is needed is education for cyclists and all road users not to mention pedestrians who wander out into the road with children when a crossing is a few yards away, Maybe we need larger fines
No matter whether you are a car driver or pedestrian or cyclist, lorry driver etc etc there are idiots to be found in all these groups, Having a "Bike awareness operation" and finding only people using mobile phones and not wearing seatbelts would indicate that it had failed, This was a kneejerk reaction to the latest cycle deaths what is needed is education for cyclists and all road users not to mention pedestrians who wander out into the road with children when a crossing is a few yards away, Maybe we need larger fines rabbitz

10:41am Sat 7 Dec 13

Methodman says...

I agree with rabbitz that there should be more fines handed out,alongside improved education of all road users.
An average road journey of around 20 minute duration reveals dozens of road users of all categories flouting traffic laws,many do it through ignorance,I would bet quite a few do it wilfully as the chance of getting caught and fined is so small.
People cannot be trusted to ' do the right thing' on our roads as the price some of us have to pay for those that don't care about anyone other than themselves is sometimes death.
Whilst I do not disagree with large scale operations like the one in the report,I think an ongoing zero tolerance approach to road safety would be a better approach.
All too often I have seen Police officers turn a blind eye to breaches of traffic law,be it road users going through red lights,speeding,havi
ng defective lights,not wearing seat belts,talking on a phone or cycling on pavements.
Every transgression that is witnessed should be prosecuted with hefty fines dished out.
If the Police say they cannot afford to prosecute everybody then the law needs to be changed so that they can keep the proceeds of fines that are imposed,just like many Police forces in the USA do.
I imagine that allowing the Police to keep the proceeds of fines would allow them to employ more Traffic officers and reduce the amount of money they need from central and local Government.
I agree with rabbitz that there should be more fines handed out,alongside improved education of all road users. An average road journey of around 20 minute duration reveals dozens of road users of all categories flouting traffic laws,many do it through ignorance,I would bet quite a few do it wilfully as the chance of getting caught and fined is so small. People cannot be trusted to ' do the right thing' on our roads as the price some of us have to pay for those that don't care about anyone other than themselves is sometimes death. Whilst I do not disagree with large scale operations like the one in the report,I think an ongoing zero tolerance approach to road safety would be a better approach. All too often I have seen Police officers turn a blind eye to breaches of traffic law,be it road users going through red lights,speeding,havi ng defective lights,not wearing seat belts,talking on a phone or cycling on pavements. Every transgression that is witnessed should be prosecuted with hefty fines dished out. If the Police say they cannot afford to prosecute everybody then the law needs to be changed so that they can keep the proceeds of fines that are imposed,just like many Police forces in the USA do. I imagine that allowing the Police to keep the proceeds of fines would allow them to employ more Traffic officers and reduce the amount of money they need from central and local Government. Methodman

1:33am Mon 9 Dec 13

Sonoo Malkani says...

Methodman's suggestion that the Police be given the powers to prosecute the offenders listed above is a good one and allowing them to keep the proceeds of these fines to plough into enlisting more officers to help implement these powers
is also sensible.However,the Laws currently don't support this so we can realistically only expect our Police to do whatever they can to help promote road safety and prevent accidents/deaths.
Methodman's suggestion that the Police be given the powers to prosecute the offenders listed above is a good one and allowing them to keep the proceeds of these fines to plough into enlisting more officers to help implement these powers is also sensible.However,the Laws currently don't support this so we can realistically only expect our Police to do whatever they can to help promote road safety and prevent accidents/deaths. Sonoo Malkani

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