‘Volume has to be controlled’

First published in About the campaign by

SCORES of readers have responded to our campaign to make Transport Music Free' and reporter Alex Ali took to the streets of Harrow to ask residents about their experiences of travelling on London's transport.

One local resident from Preston Road, had just spent 25 minutes travelling on a bus to Harrow town centre from his home. He said: "The main problem is the equipment that people bring onto buses nowadays. Before it was the same with ghetto blasters and now they have mobile phones.

"It seems to be a competition, people can't exist without extraneous noise.

"And there is nothing you can do, you can't confront it. I have just had 25 minutes of a man playing his music out of his mobile phone."

The local resident also told of another experience he had while on a train to Watford. He explained a young girl got onto a train wearing an iPod, when a man got on and sat down. He asked her to turn her music down, but found himself being sworn at in an expletive-laden tirade.

Another man, who works in St John's Road, Harrow, and lives in Amersham told of how "a couple of bad experiences four years ago" had made him "use his car more".

He said: "The train had stopped at Harrow-on-the-Hill station and I got on and looked at a man sitting down and he verbally abused me."

But Anthony Wood of Harrow Transport User's Association said: "I think that the volume has to be controlled. But if people choose to listen to music through a personal stereo then why take that away from them? It is the volume that causes the problem.

"If people can't be trusted to use them sensibly then I suppose they have to be banned.

"But the majority of people are innocent."

Mr Wood also explained that the majority of complaints the organisation received were about the behaviour of schoolchildren using public transport and he highlighted the powerlessness of staff when they are faced with antisocial behaviour.

He said: "Drivers are not allowed to leave their cab so they have to try and control the situation with persuasion and psychology and if that doesn't work then they can press the red button."

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree